DIRTY WEEKEND

DirtyWeekend

Have you ever had a one night stand or a weekend with someone that you can’t get out of your mind or your system?  You know the kind of dirty weekend that you keep as a secret and try tremendously to forget.

Les and Natalie couldn’t be more different.  Les is an uptight, middle-aged American married man to a staunch Christian and Natalie. When these coworkers get stranded in Albuquerque on their way to a business meeting in Dallas, they end up on a journey that neither one of them see coming.

As the two get to know each other, Natalie senses that Albuquerque holds a mysterious fondness for Les. Les, coercises Natalie into confessing feelings about her sub/dom relationship, in which she feels trapped and has her wearing a collar.

Writer/Director Neil LaButte is known for creating pieces of cinema and stage plays that shock, entertain and make you laugh a little at the absurdity of it all.  My personal favorite is his cooky, crazy Nurse Betty with Renee Zellweger, Chris Rock and Morgan Freeman.  This time, LaButte delves into the world of sex from a variety of different angles and leaves you with the question of things that make you go hmmmm…lol.

Les is a HUGE character departure for Matthew Broderick.  There are elements that are definitely signature for him, but for the most part — Ferris Bueller has defintely left the building.!!!  Broderick’s acting so incredibly brilliant. He is such a master of subtlety with everything he does that you forget he is acting.  One feels like a fly on the wall of a life going through a major metamorphosis and mid-life crisis.

Alice Eve as Natalie conveys all the complexities this younger generation goes through while trying to cultivate a different type of intimate relationship with ease and conviction.  I love how when her character became more relaxed and began to trust Les that her collar came off and her hair came down.

Dirty Weekend is an interesting little film and makes you think on many levels about the ways relationships are played out in today’s society.  Originally screened at the Tribeca Film Festival earlier this year, the film had a limited domestic release on September 4th and can be found on VUDU, Google Play and VOD.

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