Breakpoint

Breakpoint

Sibling rivalry is real and very intense.  Just ask Venus and Serena Williams or Bob and Mike Bryan.  Can you even begin to comprehend how mentally focused you have to be to attempt to want to do your best and beat the pants off of you sibling to win?

Seeing as we are in the middle of the U.S. Open in New York as I type with Serena Williams on the verge of making tennis history…this film is right on time.

“Break Point” features siblings are playing against each other…but playing together against others. Sounds confusing I know and in some ways paying together with unresolved issues ,in some ways can be a recipe for disaster.  If you happen to be the sibling that doesn’t pull your own weight during a match…the amount of guilt and regret results in two things.  It could make your sibling bond stronger or destroy it for eternity.

Not being a huge tennis fan, this film was fascinating tome for reasons other than the game.  The complexity of the character relationships and the writing…LOVED IT!!!

Writer, Producer and Star – Jeremy Sisto,  in between working on “Wicked City” and “The Other Side of the Door” confessed “the creative process of writing was his favorite… I appreciated having a Co-Writer as talented and disciplined as Gene Hong”.  However, when it comes to producing, he told me “The big part of producing was getting people to give me money…thinking about it makes me sweat”.

Sisto’s character Jimmy and his flippant attitude were very similar of tennis pro John McEnroe in his heyday.  Jeremy says of that comparison, “McEnroe was just very passionate about the game…Jimmy basically has no boundary he won’t cross… Jimmy’s core fabric doesn’t change, but his outlook on life does”.

Kudos to Nancy Nayor for casting this fantabulous group of actors!  Dave Walton as the younger brother Darren, is the perfect complement to the bombastic Jimmy.  Vince Ventresca is hysterical and eerily convincing as Gary, however, the scene-stealer is the young  Josh Rush as Barry.  This role is demanding for an adult and Rush handles it all with such an easy charm one forgets you’re watching this amazing emotional acting range in a child.

Oscar winner J.K. Simmons has a small, effective role as the father of these two complicated brothers, who are all trying to manipulate life without the woman who was their anchor.  Adam Devine is pure comedy gold as the sports store clerk offering  sage advice for Jimmy to better his game and concentration.

There are many moments that made me howl, but my favorite involves the song “Bust A Move”. It gives the audience insight into how these two brothers probably played when they were younger and see that their relationship isn’t as damaged as we think.

Do they pair up?  Do they participate in the Grand Slam as a doubles team?  Do they end up playing as singles?  Check it and find out.

Break Point opens today and be found online!!!

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